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Durham University

Greenspace

Walking

Walking is a great way to have time to yourself and gives you more energy to do the things you enjoy in life. In the working day it can also help you to unwind and make plans and avoid the stress of traffic jams.

May was the National Walking Month and to encourage staff and students to increase walking during the month and beyond, the University promoted the Living Streets #Try20 tips.

The University also ran its own 'walk week' to promote guided and local walks including self-guided walks around the Botanic Garden and the Hay Meadow walk, which are set out in the timetable below.

Date

Activity

Time

Location

Wednesday 8th May

Meet the Living Streets Team to find out more tips on walking.

12:00-14:00

Calman Learning Centre, Lower Mountjoy, Durham

Monday 13th May

Walk to the Wicker Man, Low Burnhall Woods, led by Mike Hughes, Head Gardener.

Please note sturdy footwear required.

No need to book - just turn up

12:00-13:00

Meet at the main Visitor Centre,

Botanic Garden

Tuesday 14th May

Food and fitness themed led walks

12:30-13:30

Meet at the White Church pub, opposite Bill Bryson Library. You must register to attend either of the walks

Guided and self-guided walks available around the Durham and Stockton areas were promoted for those unable to joing the organised walks.

Did you know that .....

  • You can burn an extra 50 caloiries per hour by standing rather than being seated - so let's get moving
  • Short walks every day has the potential to increase productivity by up to 30%?
  • When you take a step, you are using up to 200 muscles?
  • Walking one mile can burn up to 100 Calories of energy and walking two miles a day, three times a week, can help reduce weight by one pound every three weeks?
  • People who are active have lower rates of coronary heart disease, high blood presure, stroke, diabetes, colon and breast cancer, and depression (WHO, 2001).