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Durham University

Faculty Handbook Archive

Archive Module Description

This page is for the academic year 2014-15. The current handbook year is 2019-20

Department: Theology and Religion

THEO1171: CHRISTIANITY IN CONTEXT

Type Open Level 1 Credits 20 Availability Available in 2014/15 Module Cap None. Location Durham

Prerequisites

  • None.

Corequisites

  • None.

Excluded Combination of Modules

  • None.

Aims

  • To provide an introduction to the history of Christianity and to its relationships with its social and cultural contexts.
  • To introduce students to theological sources from different periods of Christian history.
  • To equip students with skills and knowledge for further study of this subject area at level 2.

Content

  • This module introduces students to the development of Christianity over 2000 years.
  • It explores the interrelationship between the Christian religion and its social and cultural contexts, examining the ways in which Christianity has shaped and been shaped by its environment.
  • Students will have opportunities to engage with primary sources.

Learning Outcomes

Subject-specific Knowledge:
  • A knowledge of the underlying concepts and principles associated with the study of the history of Christianity, and an ability to evaluate and interpret these within the context of that area of study.
  • A basic knowledge of the history of Christianity and of the relationship between Christianity and its social and cultural contexts.
Subject-specific Skills:
  • Basic experience in the handling of primary theological texts and an appreciation of the associated problems.
Key Skills:
  • Skills in the acquisition of information through reading and research, and in the structured presentation of information in written form.

Modes of Teaching, Learning and Assessment and how these contribute to the learning outcomes of the module

  • Lectures convey information and exemplify an approach to the subject-matter, enabling students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and to improve their skills in listening and in evaluating information.
  • Seminars enhance subject-specific knowledge and understanding both through preparation and through interaction with students and staff, promoting awareness of different viewpoints and approaches. In this module, seminars are used for the study of the primary texts.
  • Through small-group discussion, tutorials provide feedback on student work and the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.
  • Formative essays develop subject-specific knowledge and understanding, along with student skills in the acquisition of information through reading and research, and in the structured presentation of information in written form.
  • Examinations assess subject-specific knowledge and understanding, along with student skills in the structured presentation of information in written form under time constraints. .

Teaching Methods and Contact Hours

Activity Number Frequency Duration Total/Hours
Lectures 19 1 per week 1 hour 19
Seminars 12 6 in Michaelmas Term, 6 in Epiphany Term 1 hour 12
Preparation and Reading 169
Total 200

Summative Assessment

Component: Examination Component Weighting: 100%
Element Length / duration Element Weighting Resit Opportunity
three-hour examination 100%

Formative Assessment:

2 in-class tests (50 minutes): one in Michaelmas, one in Epiphany


Attendance at all activities marked with this symbol will be monitored. Students who fail to attend these activities, or to complete the summative or formative assessment specified above, will be subject to the procedures defined in the University's General Regulation V, and may be required to leave the University