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Durham University

Email and Telephone Directory

Staff Profile

Professor Philip Williamson

(email at p.a.williamson@durham.ac.uk)

Philip Williamson is a historian of twentieth-century British politics, and aspects of religion and the monarchy in Britain and the British empire since the sixteenth century. His publications on interwar British politics, political culture and government range across the Labour, Liberal and Conservative parties, trade unions, big business, and financial, economic and imperial policies. His most recent work includes studies of the Church of England and politics since 1900, and anniversary thanksgivings under Elizabeth I and James I. He is chief editor – with Natalie Mears and Stephen Taylor – of the project on British state prayers, fasts and thanksgivings, published in four volumes, and co-investigator for the project on ‘Church, state and nation: the journals of Hensley Henson, dean and bishop of Durham’, published online.

Research Groups

Department of History

Research Projects

Department of History

Research Interests

  • British politics and government 1900-1960
  • The churches and special worship in the British Isles and the empire since 1530
  • The modern British monarchy

Publications

Authored book

Edited book

Chapter in book

Journal Article

Newspaper/Magazine Article

  • Williamson, Philip (2021). Churchill and the churches. Finest Hour (191): 12-16.
  • Williamson, Philip (2020). Stanley Baldwin and Winston Churchill: a study in contrasts. Finest Hour (188): 22-27.
  • Williamson, Philip (2020). Wars, famines - and pandemics. Church Times (3 April 2020).

Scholarly Edition

Selected Grants

  • 2016: Royalty and religion in the British Isles since 1689 (£127569.00 from The Leverhulme Trust)
  • 2007: BRITISH STATE PRAYERS, FASTS AND THANKSGIVINGS (£330172.14 from Arts and Humanities Research Council)