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Durham University

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Staff Profile

Professor Roger Masterman, LLB, LLM, AKC

Professor in Durham Law School
Telephone: +44 (0) 191 33 42799
Fax: +44 (0) 191 33 42801
Room number: PCL211
Member of the Human Rights Centre

Contact Professor Roger Masterman (email at r.m.w.masterman@durham.ac.uk)

Biography

Roger Masterman joined Durham Law School in 2002 as Senior Research Associate, and until 2005 worked on the AHRC-funded project, ‘Judicial Reasoning and the Human Rights Act 1998.’ He was appointed Lecturer in Law in 2005, was promoted to Senior Lecturer in 2008, to Reader in 2011 and to Professor in 2013. He served as Head of Durham Law School between 2013 and 2016. 

His teaching and research interests lie in constitutional law and reform, particularly in the Human Rights Act 1998 and in the relevance of the separation of powers doctrine to the United Kingdom's constitution. He has a particular interest in the relationship between the European Court of Human Rights and domestic courts, and is well-known for his work on the mechanics and application of s.2(1) of the Human Rights Act.

He is the author of The Separation of Powers in the Contemporary Constitution: Judicial competence and independence in the United Kingdom (Cambridge University Press, 2011) and (with Ian Leigh) Making Rights Real: The Human Rights Act in its First Decade (Hart Publishing, 2008). Alongside Robert Schütze he is editor of the Cambridge Companion to Comparative Constitutional Law (Cambridge University Press, 2019). 

The second edition of his textbook Constitutional and Administrative Law - written with Colin Murray of Newcastle Law School - was published in the Longman Law Series in 2018. Law-related tweets, and short updates to the latter, can be found by following @mastermanmurray

His current projects include an essay on Brexit and the United Kingdom’s devolutionary constitution, and a study of the influence of Judicial Committee of the Privy Council decisions on constitutional decision-making in the UK Supreme Court.

Roger is a graduate of King’s College London (LLB and AKC (1998), LLM (Public Law) (1999)), and has worked previously at the Constitution Unit, University College London. He is a member of the Editorial Committee of Public Law, serves on the Executive Committee of the UK Constitutional Law Association and is a regular contributor to the UK Constitutional Law Association blog: http://ukconstitutionallaw.org/blog/.

 

Teaching Areas

UK Constitutional Law

Comparative Constitutional Law

Advanced Issues in Public Law

Research Groups

Durham Law School

  • Human Rights Centre

Research Projects

Durham Law School

  • Grants

Research Interests

  • Comparative Constitutional Law
  • UK Constitutional Law
  • Constitutional Reform
  • The Human Rights Act 1998
  • The Judiciary

Selected Publications

Authored book

  • Masterman, R.M.W & Murray, C.R.G. (2018). Constitutional and Administrative Law. Pearson.
  • Masterman, R.M.W. & Murray, C.R.G. (2013). Exploring Constitutional and Administrative Law. Pearson.
  • Masterman, R. (2011). The Separation of Powers in the Contemporary Constitution: Judicial Competence and Independence in the United Kingdom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Leigh, I.D. & Masterman, RMW. (2008). Making Rights Real: the Human Rights Act in its First Decade. Oxford: Hart Publishing.

Edited book

  • Masterman, Roger & Schütze, Robert (2019). The Cambridge Companion to Comparative Constitutional Law. Cambridge University Press.
  • Masterman, R & Leigh, I (2013). The United Kingdom's Statutory Bill of Rights: Constitutional and Comparative Perspectives. Oxford: Oxford University Press/Proceedings of the British Academy.
  • Fenwick, H.M., Phillipson, G. & Masterman, R. (2007). Judicial Reasoning under the UK Human Rights Act. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chapter in book

  • Masterman, R.M.W. (2020). 'New Labour's Judicial Power Project'. In The New Labour Constitution: Twenty Years On. Gordon, M. & Tucker, A. Hart.
  • Masterman, R.M.W. (2019). 'Multi-Layered Constitutions'. In The Cambridge Companion to Comparative Constitutional Law. Masterman, R.M.W. & Schütze, R. Cambridge University Press.
  • Masterman, R.M.W. (2018). Federal Dynamics of the UK/Strasbourg Relationship. In The United Kingdom and the Federal Idea. Schütze, R. & Tierney, S. Hart. 203-226.
  • Masterman, R.M.W. & Wheatle, S. (2018). Unity, Disunity and Vacuity: Constitutional Adjudication and the Common law. In The Unity of Public Law: Doctrinal, Theoretical and Comparative Perspectives. Elliott, M, Varuhas, JNE & Wilson Stark, S Hart. 123-148.
  • Masterman, R.M.W. (2017). Process and Substance in the United Kingdom and at Strasbourg: Proportionality, Subsidiarity, Complementarity? In Procedural Review in European Fundamental Rights Cases. Gerards, J. & Brems, E. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 242-271.
  • Masterman, R.M.W. (2016). The United Kingdom: From Strasbourg Surrogacy towards a British Bill of Rights? In Criticism of the European Court of Human Rights: Shifting the convention system: counter-dynamics at the national and EU level. Lambrecht, S., Lemmens, K. & Popelier, P. Cambridge: Intersentia. 9: 447-478.
  • Masterman, R.M.W. (2014). Rebalancing the Unbalanced Constitution: Juridification and National Security in the United Kingdom. In Critical Debates on Counter-Terrorist Judicial Review. Davis, F.F. & de Londras, F. Cambridge University Press. 209-227.
  • Masterman, R.M.W. (2014). The United Kingdom. In Implementation of the European Convention on Human Rights and of the judgments of the ECtHR in national case law: a comparative analysis. Gerards, J.H. & Fleuren, J.W.A. Cambridge: Intersentia. 297-332.
  • Masterman, R & Leigh, I (2013). 'The United Kingdom's Human Rights Project in Constitutional and Comparative Perspective'. In The United Kingdom's Statutory Bill of Rights: Constitutional and Comparative Perspectives. Masterman, R & Leigh, I Oxford: Oxford University Press /British Academy. Proceedings of the British Academy, vol 183: 1-22.
  • Masterman, R. (2013). Deconstructing the Mirror Principle. In The United Kingdom's Statutory Bill of Rights: Constitutional and Comparative Perspectives. Masterman, R. & Leigh, I. Oxford: Oxford University Press/British Academy. 183 (Proceedings of the British Academy): 111-137.
  • Masterman, R.M.W. (2007). Aspiration or Foundation? The Status of the Strasbourg Jurisprudence and the 'Convention Rights' in Domestic Law. In Judicial Reasoning under the UK Human Rights Act. Fenwick, H., Masterman, R. & Phillipson, G. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 57-86.
  • Fenwick, H.M., Masterman, R. & Phillipson, G. (2007). Introduction: The Human Rights Act in contemporary context. In Judicial Reasoning under the UK Human Rights Act. Fenwick, H.M., Phillipson, G. & Masterman, R. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 1-21.

Journal Article

  • Fenwick, H. & Masterman, R. (2017). The Conservative Project to ‘Break the Link between British Courts and Strasbourg’ Rhetoric or Reality? Modern Law Review 80(6): 1111-1136.
  • Masterman, R.M.W. & Murkens, J.E.K. (2013). Skirting supremacy and subordination: the constitutional authority of the United Kingdom Supreme Court. Public Law 2013(4): 800-820.
  • Masterman, R.M.W. & Murkens, J.E.K. (2012). Zwischen Vorrangstellung und Ergebenheit: Der Verfassungsstatus des Supreme Court im Vereinigten Königreich. JuristenZeitung 67(21): 1029-1040.
  • Masterman, R.M.W. (2009). Interpretations, declarations and dialogue: rights protection under the Human Rights Act and Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities. Public Law (1): 112-131.
  • Masterman, R.M.W. (2009). Juridification, sovereignty and separation of powers. Parliamentary Affairs 62(3): 499-502.
  • Masterman, R.M.W. (2009). Labour’s ‘Juridification’ of the Constitution. Parliamentary Affairs 62(3): 476-492.
  • Masterman, R. (2005). Determinative in the Abstract? Article 6(1) and the Separation of Powers. European Human Rights Law Review (6): 628-648.
  • Masterman, R. (2005). Taking the Strasbourg Jurisprudence into Account: developing a “municipal law of human rights” under the Human Rights Act 1998. International and Comparative Law Quarterly 54(4): 907-932.
  • Masterman, R. (2004). A Supreme Court for the United Kingdom Two Steps Forward, but one Step Back on Judicial Independence. Public Law 4: 48-58.
  • Masterman, R. (2004). Section 2(1) of the Human Rights Act 1998: Binding Domestic Courts to Strasbourg? Public Law 12: 725-737.
  • Masterman, R., Hazell R, Gay A, Trench S, King M, Sandford R & Maer L (2003). The Constitution: Consolidation and Cautious Advance. Parliamentary Affairs 56(2): 157-169.

Book review

  • Masterman, R.M.W. (2011). Review of Tom Hickman, Public Law after the Human Rights Act (Hart, 2010). Public Law (3): 651-655.

Conference Paper

  • Masterman, R.M.W (2016), Breaking the Link with Strasbourg? From the Human Rights Act towards a British Bill of Rights, Faculty of Law, Hong Kong University.
  • Masterman, R. (2012), 'What judges talk about when they talk about separation of powers', Beyond Montesquieu: Rethinking the architecture of contemporary governance. Dublin, Ireland, Dublin.
  • Masterman, R. (2010), Dynamics of a contemporary separation of powers, WG Hart Legal Workshop 2010. Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, London, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, London.
  • Masterman, R. (2010), Escaping the Mirror Principle: Towards a municipal law of human rights?, Symposium to Mark the Tenth Anniversary of the Human Rights Act. St John's College, Durham University, St John's College, Durham University.
  • Masterman, R (2010), The Form and Substance of the United Kingdom's Separation of Powers, The UK and US in 2010: Transition and Transformation. George Washington University, Washington DC, George Washington University, Washington DC.

Report

  • Masterman, R.M.W. (2015). Supreme, submissive or symbiotic? United Kingdom Courts and the European Court of Human Rights. Law School. London, The Constitution Unit, School of Public Policy, UCL.

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Supervises