Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.

Durham University

Durham Global Security Institute

Research Seminars

Thursday 9 May 2019 - Dr Lars Waldorf

'Peacebuilding through Dance and Legal Empowerment in Post-War Sri Lanka'

Time: 3pm - 4.30pm, followed by snacks

Place: Room IM 201, Al Qasimi Building, School of Government and International Affairs, Durham University

Contact: lena.s.opfermann@durham.ac.uk

The arts are increasingly used to promote peacebuilding, transitional justice, and reconciliation in post-war environments. Theatre has attracted most of the attention while dance has been relatively neglected. This talk looks closely at a project that combined inclusive dance and rights-awareness in post-war Sri Lanka, and its impacts on people with conflict-related disabilities. The talk also draws larger lessons about the role of the performing arts in peacebuilding.

Further information on Dr Lars Waldorf can be found here.

Thursday 28 February 2019 - Dr Toni Haastrup

'Practicing the Women, Peace and Security Agenda in Africa: A Regional Perspective'

Time: 5pm - 6pm

Place: Room MHL452, Durham Business School, Durham University

Contact: maja.davidovic@durham.ac.uk

In the almost 20 years that the Women Peace and Security (WPS) agenda has existed, it has encouraged the centring of gender concerns in the global governance of security. Dominant in the narratives of WPS practice is the impact of the Global North in this area, as we see in the foreign policy priorities of Canada, Sweden and the UK. The dominant narratives tend to exclude the contributions of those outside of the Global North to knowledge about what the WPS is. A reflection on the role of the African women supported by the African Union in particular suggests Africa as a key source towards a WPS agenda that is transformative. By taking into account the initiatives at the regional level and the role of feminists, African practices of WPS can be re-read not as the outcome of received Northern knowledge, but rather as African innovations within the WPS informed global security architecture.

The lecture draws on a recent book chapter and ongoing work that looks at developments in the WPS agenda at regional levels in both Africa and Europe.

Thursday 31 January 2019 - Dr Meera Sabaratnam

'Decolonising Intervention: International Statebuilding in Mozambique'

Time: Cancelled

Place: Lindisfarne Center, St. Aidan's College, Durham University

Contact: louis.f.monroy-santander@durham.ac.uk

What do international interventions look like to those who are their targets? And what does this tell us about how we can theorise the international? In this talk, I present the findings of my research on international statebuilding interventions in Mozambique, which focuses on the experiences and perspectives of Mozambican observers and participants in three sectors - health, agriculture and governance. This gives us an insight into the transformation of the state through intervention, the effects it has had (or not) on the wider political economy of Mozambique, and the ways in which discourses of intervention have contributed to public debates around corruption. I use decolonising research strategies and concepts from de-colonial theory to analyse the results. Mozambique was for many years considered a 'poster child' of post-war peacebuilding - the country was at peace after a long war, elections were held regularly and economic growth rates appeared very high. Yet, it has recently lost this reputation due to considerable political instability. I argue that the insights offered from the perspectives of the study help us make sense of the conditions of precarity underpinning these changes.

For more information on Dr Sabaratnam click here

Thursday 22 November 2018 - Heather Marquette, University of Birmingham

'Islands of Integrity research'

Time: 5pm to 6:30pm

Place: Room IM102, School of Government and International Affairs

Contact: louis.f.monroy-santander@durham.ac.uk

Corruption researchers tend to focus a lot of attention on why systemically corrupt countries fail to improve and why anticorruption efforts often fall flat. As such, the field has had a difficult time identifying and explaining how positive change happens in order to inspire new and more effective anticorruption interventions.

This research focuses on the opposite: potential success stories in anticorruption. Using a novel three-step methodology developed to identify previously hidden ‘positive outliers’, we look at sectors within a country that have successfully reduced bribery against the odds in otherwise systemically corrupt countries. Having identified up to 18 potential cases, we drill down in two ‘positive outlier’ cases—Uganda’s health sector and South Africa’s police—to uncover the political processes and policies that have been responsible for bribery reduction in each case. In doing so, we draw out lessons about how positive changes happened and what can be learned for more successful anti-corruption interventions. However, our success cases also highlight some important tensions that raise red flags for future interventions, and we look at important lessons from these as well. We look forward to sharing the findings from the research and to discussing the potential implications for anticorruption policy and practice.

Tuesday 13 November 2018 - Dr Louis Monroy-Santander

Film Screening: 'Yugonostalgia: A visual construction of Vareš'

Time: 4pm - 6:30pm

Place: Lindisfarne centre, St. Aidan’s College

Contact: louis.f.monroy-santander@durham.ac.uk

This video project focuses on the Bosnian town of Vareš as a site for understanding Yugonostalgia, as a form of critique of current life in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Yugo-nostalgia refers both to the romanticization of life under the Federal Socialist Republic of Yugoslavia, and a critical look at the impact of post-war capitalism and reconstruction in the Western Balkans. Vareš emerges as a site for both young and old generations’ views on the hardship and difficulties of rebuilding Bosnia-Herzegovina after the war in the 1990’s, their critique of privatization and capitalist practices, often tied to ethnically-based politics, as well as their memories and (re)construction of life under Tito’s socialism.

Tuesday 8 November 2018 - Raphaela Kormoll

'The Militarization of the Punjab Borderland: Fear, Gender and Displacement'

Conflict+

Time: 4:30pm to 6pm

Place: IM205, School of Government and International Affairs

Contact: jutta.bakonyi@durham.ac.uk

Tuesday 30 October 2018 - André Bank

'In the Neighbourhood of War: Transformations in the Syrian-Jordanian Borderland'

Time: 5pm to 6:30pm

Place: Room MHL452, Durham University Business School

Contact: louis.f.monroy-santander@durham.ac.uk

Wars tend to transform not only the spaces in which the violent fighting takes place, but also the spaces close by, including the border regions in neighbouring states. The Syrian war is no exception to this, quite the contrary: From the very beginning of the war in 2011, prominent politicians, opinion-makers and conflict diffusion scholars voiced strong calls that warned of a ‘regional wildfire,’ of the Syrian conflict quasi-naturally spreading to Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan and Turkey. While not denying the massive neighbourhood effects of the war over the last seven years, the presentation still calls for a more nuanced understanding of the transformations of the borderlands of the Syrian conflict. Based on qualitative field research in Northern Jordan (Irbid, Mafraq, Ramtha), it is argued that the local logics of (in)security need to be disaggregated both temporally and spatially. Such a bottom-up perspective that takes up the perceptions of (in)security of the people living in the borderland of war cautions against overly simplistic models of violent conflict diffusion and spread.

More information

Wednesday 17 October 2018 - Lt Gen Robin Brims

'Planning to the Finish - Managing the Political/Military Interface'

Time: 5pm to 6:30pm

Place: IM201, Al-Qasimi Building, Durham University

Contact: louis.f.monroy-santander@durham.ac.uk

Monday 8 October 2018 - Dr Antonis A. Ellinas

'Organizing against Democracy: The local organizational development of the Golden Dawn in Greece and Europe'

Time: 12pm to 2pm

Place: Room IM222, School of Government and International Affairs

Contact: olga.demetriou@durham.ac.uk

In the past few decades, far right parties have developed from marginal political actors into potent political forces in Europe, changing the contours of the political debate and challenging the moral foundations of liberal democracy. Despite the geographical spread of, and scholarly attention to this phenomenon, remarkably little is known about the internal mechanics of these parties and the micro-dynamics shaping their organizational development. Using a vast array of evidence to examine the organizational life of one of the most extreme far right parties in Europe, the Greek Golden Dawn, the lecture analyses the trajectory of dozens of its local organizations, developing an analytical framework to show how these local party units are able to grow roots in some settings but completely fail in others. The talk systematically explains how environmental and endogenous factors affect the capacity of the Golden Dawn to infiltrate local societies. This ends exploring the applicability of this framework across Europe by examining the development of the far right in Germany and Slovakia.

More information

Tuesday 22 May 2018 - Dr Jelena Obradović-Wochnik

'Urban Geographies of the Refugee Crisis: considering the public/private and city/state in Belgrade and Athens'

Time: 5.30pm to 5pm

Place: Room CG218, Chemistry Department, Durham University

Contact: louis.f.monroy-santander@durham.ac.uk

From the ‘Calais Jungle’ to the ‘City Plaza’ squat in central Athens, makeshift settlements have become an integral part of refugee journeys to the EU. Such settlements are often ‘off the grid’ and receive no aid or services, except that provided informally by volunteers and activists. This presentation examines informal refugee settlements in urban areas of transit countries, by focusing on Belgrade and Athens.

This discussion considers the urban and spatial politics of the refugee ‘crisis’ in transit countries; specifically, it takes a detailed look at cities hosting informal settlements and transient refugee populations, and the actors and spaces shaping refugee lives. It considers how urban spaces are used and adapted by refugees and activists to create temporary settlements and aid network, but also, how authorities employ surveillance and spatial practices aimed at regulating the presence of refugees in centrally located public spaces. In its focus on cities, the presentation also places the informal settlements into a broader context: refugee settlements make use of spaces that are already subjected to pre-existing local politics and contestations over land, regeneration and property development, and this often results in evictions or demolitions of refugee housing.

More information

Tuesday 1 May 2018 - Professor Siniša Malešević

'The rise of organised brutality: historical sociology and violence'

Time: 5pm to 6:30pm

Place: Room W309, Geography Department, Durham University

Contact: louis.f.monroy-santander@durham.ac.uk

There is a tendency among general public to assume that social development and violence are mutually exclusive phenomena. Civilisation and development are typically associated with progress, order and constant ambition towards human perfectibility whereas violence is generally understood to be a form of regression characterised by death, destruction, and chaos. However there is in fact a very strong historical link between violence and social development. In this presentation I explore this link through the prism of historical sociology. I argue that the organised violence develops quite late in human history and that its proliferation is closely tied with the expansion of organisational and ideological powers and the organisational ability to penetrate the networks of micro-solidarity.

More information

Thursday 26 April 2018 - Professor Mustafa Dikeç

‘Urban Rage:The Revolt of the Excluded’

Time: 5:00pm to 6:30pm

Place: Room IM201, Al-Qasimi Building, School of Government and International Affairs.

Contact: louis.f.monroy-santander@durham.ac.uk

In his book, Urban Rage: The revolt of the excluded, Mustafa Dikeç looks at urban-based protests and riots in different democratic countries (France, Greece, Sweden, United Kingdom, United States and Turkey). His observations point towards the underlying resentment, grievances and forms of exclusion prevailing in democratic systems, and as failures of democracy become sources of instability and protest. Mustafa Dikeç’s research points towards political decision-making and policing procedures in the mentioned democracies as focal areas for change that can redress grievances and exclusion, address the difficulties arising from urban revolt.

More information

Tuesday 24 April - Dr Louis Francis Monroy-Santander

'Whatever happened to transitional justice? Views from the ground in Bosnia-Herzegovina'

Conflict+

Time: 4pm to 5:30pm

Place: Room IM205, School of Government and International Affairs

Contact: louis.f.monroy-santander@durham.ac.uk

Tuesday 20 March 2018 - Dr Jutta Bakonyi

'Urban Badlands: The dark side of global and less global cities'

Conflict+

Time: 4pm to 5:30pm

Place: IM205, School of Government and International Affairs

Contact: jutta.bakonyi@durham.ac.uk

Monday 5 March 2018 - Concert by the interreligious choir Pontanima from Sarajevo

Time: 7pm to 9pm

Place: Durham Cathedral

Contact:stefanie.kappler@durham.ac.uk

For further information click here.

A report of the event can be accessed here.

Thursday 15 March 2018 - Teach-Out Event

'Solidarity against Racism'

Time: 2pm to 5pm

Place: Durham Miners Hall, 8 Flass St, Durham DH1 4BE

Contact: louis.f.monroy-santander@durham.ac.uk

The Durham Global Security Institute (DGSI) together with the University and College Union (UCU) and Stand Up To Racism Northeast invited to a discussion of racism in Durham. ‘Solidarity against Racism’ aimed at providing a space to address forms and experiences of racism and Islamophobia in Durham, but also in the wider context of the UK and Europe. We hope to strengthen interaction between those in the University and in Durham who stand up against any form of hatred and discrimination.

More information

Wednesday 21 February 2018 - Amra Mujkanović

'The consequences of hatred when left unchallenged'

Time: 5:00pm to 6:30pm

Place: W309, Geography Department

Contact: louis.f.monroy-santander@durham.ac.uk

More information

Wednesday 24 January 2018 - Special Conflict Cluster Meeting

Reconciliation: Reflections on Bangladesh and Sri Lanka

Time: 2pm to 3:30pm

Place: Calman Learning Centre, top floor.

Jacco Visser (School for Communication and Culture, Aarhus University) & Ben Hildred (Department of Anthropology, Durham University)

Reconciliation is both internationally recognised while being informed by local context. Being a broad, at times fuzzy concept that takes place on different scales, from the personal to the public, and through different initiatives, ranging from truth commissions, tribunals, to commemorations and sport activities, the concept poses numerous challenges/problems for the anthropologist who investigates it. Against this background, we reflect on the complexities of examining reconciliation in our own work. Jacco discusses challenges to reconciliatory engagements with the past based on ongoing fieldwork with the Bangladeshi diaspora in London, while Ben explains the place of reconciliation in his preparation for fieldwork in Sri Lanka.

More information

Tuesday 20 January 2018 - Jestina Mukoko

'End of an Era: Is this an Opportunity for Zimbabwe to Respect Human Rights?'

Time: 5pm to 6:30pm

Place: Room 102, School of Government and International Affairs

Contact: lena.s.opfermann@durham.ac.uk

In this talk, Jestina Mukoko, National Director of the Zimbabwe Peace Project (ZPP), explored the situation in Zimbabwe after President Mugabe's removal from power after 37 years in office. Specifically, she analysed in how far the new administration takes on the opportunity to engage Zimbabweans in dialogue.

More information

Tuesday 5 December 2017 - Dr Srinjoy Bose

'Conflict Management, Extractive Industries, and the 2014 International Military Exit Strategy in Afghanistan'

Time: 4pm to 5:30pm

Place: Room D104, Dawson Building, Anthropology Department

Contact: srinjoy.bose@durham.ac.uk

Tuesday 14 November 2017 - Conflict Cluster Meeting

A Discussion of: Benner, Neil, Peck, Jamie and Theodore, Nik (2010). Variegated neoliberalization: geographies, modalities, pathways. Global Networks, 10 (2): 182-222.

Conflict+

Time: 4pm to 5:30pm

Place: Anthropology Department

Contact:jutta.bakonyi@durham.ac.uk

Wednesay 8 November 2018 - Dr Ayesha Siddiqa

'CPEC and Pakistan: Perceptions and Challenges'

Time: 2pm to 3:30pm

Place: Room IM102, School of Government and International Affairs

Contact:s.r.gregory@durham.ac.uk

The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), a part of China's ‘One Belt, One Road Initiative’, means many different things to Pakistanis. From a road to economic growth and sustainability, to breaking the shackles of American patronage, to a new formula of corporate authoritarianism, CPEC encapsulates the dreams and hopes of millions of Pakistan's citizens. This talk focused on outlining the various stakeholders in Pakistan and their respective perspectives on the road. In doing so, it illuminated the complex national discourse on the initiative and the challenges that CPEC has begun to pose internally for the Pakistani state and nation.

Wednesday 1 November 2017 - Dr Alexander Evans (UK Deputy High Commissioner to India)

'Geopolitics, security and terrorism in South Asia'

Time: 2pm to 3:30pm

Place: Room 102, School of Government and International Affairs

Contact: s.r.gregory@durham.ac.uk