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Durham University

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

Previous Events

List of months

Tuesday 6 June 2017

CVAC Advisory Board and AGM

10:45am to 5:00pm, Van Mildert College

All welcome, please register by Tuesday 30 May 2017 to lotta.vaananen@durham.ac.uk

Schedule:-

10.45am - Coffee

11.00am - Welcome by CVAC Director & Presentation of Durham University Cultural Strategy by Keith Bartlett

11.30am-12.00noon - Alex Collingwood-Swinburn, the University's Art Curator introduces the University's Art Collection

12.00noon-12.30pm - Mike Collier, Esen Kaya and Alix Collingwood-Swinburn introduce the proposed Drawing Biennale 2017

12.30pm - Breakout groups to discuss collaborative projects which include 'Drawing' and 'Portraiture'

1.00pm - Lunch and discussion

1.30pm-2.30pm - Elizabeth Edwards, Victoria and Albert Research Centre: Photographs and the Business of 'Doing History'

2.30pm-3.30pm - Jean-Baptiste Gouyon, University College, London, Experts in the Wild: Constructing Knowledges of Nature with the Camera

3.30pm - Plenary Discussion and Tea


Monday 12 June 2017

Wednesday 14 June 2017

Borders, Regimes, Disposability - A Symposium on Migration and State Violence - 14th - 16th June 2017, Durham University

12:00pm to 6:30pm

“Borders, Regimes, Disposability” is an international symposium that brings together several scholars from across disciplinary affiliations and different parts of the world. Our three-day academic itinerary will provocatively engage in, inquire, and rethink the manifold and unstoppable movements, expulsions of bodies, figurations of borders, and processes of bordering that are impacting and directing our critical junctures around these themes. The intellectual exchange—deliberative, complementary, and perhaps even conflicting—is intended as a means for contributors to work through and build on their scholarly questions, commitments, and contributions, thereby complicating standard notions on the figure, or the ideological shape, of the migrant. How are we conceptually handling and theorizing the unfolding but also intersectional scholarly archive of the migrant and migration? What are the conditions through which expulsed others are made, and what is their relation to the future, to the quest of and claims for inclusion, which may oftentimes transcend conventional understandings of citizenship and the nation? What new concepts of meaning are we generating as a tool of engagement, as an animating but lasting epistemology that helps us register the regimes of global social motion including their agentive responses?

Structured as a series of 6 workshops, the symposium seeks to interrogate the idea of borders themselves, which despite the myriad crossings are by too many analysts still treated as fixed and even static, and in relation only to bodies moving across “autonomous” or sovereign territories. What of borders that exist within territories as well, mapped along imaginaries of desirable and undesirable bodies, bodies at risk and even pre-risk bodies, the latter referring to bodies already marked and mapped as transgressive and disposable?

We will examine the idea of the migrant. How is this figure changing in the context of neoliberal globalization? In short, has the migrant become less the figure captured in the 1960s and 1970s paradigms of migration, of those moving from instability to stability or from unstable to stable regions of economic development, thereby balancing socio-economic inequalities? Might the gendered migrant be better apprehended as a fugitive fleeing from one state of crisis into another, and therefore be an expression of the generalized state of abjection and disposability? Might the contemporary conjuncture of “borders, regimes, disposability" be rehearsing a state of “history under conditions of impossibility”—a tale that exceeds the exploitation story?


Thursday 15 June 2017

Borders, Regimes, Disposability - A Symposium on Migration and State Violence - 14th - 16th June 2017, Durham University

12:00pm to 6:30pm

“Borders, Regimes, Disposability” is an international symposium that brings together several scholars from across disciplinary affiliations and different parts of the world. Our three-day academic itinerary will provocatively engage in, inquire, and rethink the manifold and unstoppable movements, expulsions of bodies, figurations of borders, and processes of bordering that are impacting and directing our critical junctures around these themes. The intellectual exchange—deliberative, complementary, and perhaps even conflicting—is intended as a means for contributors to work through and build on their scholarly questions, commitments, and contributions, thereby complicating standard notions on the figure, or the ideological shape, of the migrant. How are we conceptually handling and theorizing the unfolding but also intersectional scholarly archive of the migrant and migration? What are the conditions through which expulsed others are made, and what is their relation to the future, to the quest of and claims for inclusion, which may oftentimes transcend conventional understandings of citizenship and the nation? What new concepts of meaning are we generating as a tool of engagement, as an animating but lasting epistemology that helps us register the regimes of global social motion including their agentive responses?

Structured as a series of 6 workshops, the symposium seeks to interrogate the idea of borders themselves, which despite the myriad crossings are by too many analysts still treated as fixed and even static, and in relation only to bodies moving across “autonomous” or sovereign territories. What of borders that exist within territories as well, mapped along imaginaries of desirable and undesirable bodies, bodies at risk and even pre-risk bodies, the latter referring to bodies already marked and mapped as transgressive and disposable?

We will examine the idea of the migrant. How is this figure changing in the context of neoliberal globalization? In short, has the migrant become less the figure captured in the 1960s and 1970s paradigms of migration, of those moving from instability to stability or from unstable to stable regions of economic development, thereby balancing socio-economic inequalities? Might the gendered migrant be better apprehended as a fugitive fleeing from one state of crisis into another, and therefore be an expression of the generalized state of abjection and disposability? Might the contemporary conjuncture of “borders, regimes, disposability" be rehearsing a state of “history under conditions of impossibility”—a tale that exceeds the exploitation story?


Friday 16 June 2017

Borders, Regimes, Disposability - A Symposium on Migration and State Violence - 14th - 16th June 2017, Durham University

12:00pm to 6:30pm

“Borders, Regimes, Disposability” is an international symposium that brings together several scholars from across disciplinary affiliations and different parts of the world. Our three-day academic itinerary will provocatively engage in, inquire, and rethink the manifold and unstoppable movements, expulsions of bodies, figurations of borders, and processes of bordering that are impacting and directing our critical junctures around these themes. The intellectual exchange—deliberative, complementary, and perhaps even conflicting—is intended as a means for contributors to work through and build on their scholarly questions, commitments, and contributions, thereby complicating standard notions on the figure, or the ideological shape, of the migrant. How are we conceptually handling and theorizing the unfolding but also intersectional scholarly archive of the migrant and migration? What are the conditions through which expulsed others are made, and what is their relation to the future, to the quest of and claims for inclusion, which may oftentimes transcend conventional understandings of citizenship and the nation? What new concepts of meaning are we generating as a tool of engagement, as an animating but lasting epistemology that helps us register the regimes of global social motion including their agentive responses?

Structured as a series of 6 workshops, the symposium seeks to interrogate the idea of borders themselves, which despite the myriad crossings are by too many analysts still treated as fixed and even static, and in relation only to bodies moving across “autonomous” or sovereign territories. What of borders that exist within territories as well, mapped along imaginaries of desirable and undesirable bodies, bodies at risk and even pre-risk bodies, the latter referring to bodies already marked and mapped as transgressive and disposable?

We will examine the idea of the migrant. How is this figure changing in the context of neoliberal globalization? In short, has the migrant become less the figure captured in the 1960s and 1970s paradigms of migration, of those moving from instability to stability or from unstable to stable regions of economic development, thereby balancing socio-economic inequalities? Might the gendered migrant be better apprehended as a fugitive fleeing from one state of crisis into another, and therefore be an expression of the generalized state of abjection and disposability? Might the contemporary conjuncture of “borders, regimes, disposability" be rehearsing a state of “history under conditions of impossibility”—a tale that exceeds the exploitation story?


Monday 19 June 2017

An Interdisciplinary Study Day at The Bowes Museum - 19 June 2017

10:00am to 6:00pm, Bowes Museum

Contact catherine.dickinson@thebowesmuseum.org.uk for more information about this event.


Wednesday 21 June 2017

They Will Have to Kill Us First’ documentary screening and discussion during Refugee Week 2017 - Wednesday 21 June 2017

5:40pm, Gala Theatre, Durham

CVAC is delighted to be hosting a screening & discussion night of director Johanna Schwartz’s award-winning documentary ‘They Will Have to Kill Us First’, as part of Refugee Week’s film initiative ‘Moving Worlds’, committed to raising awareness around the refugee experience through inspiring cinematic storytelling.

The ‘refugee crisis’ has given rise to a proliferation of visual images and conceptions of refugees, initiating new understandings of what refugees may ‘look like’, therefore instructing particular ways of ‘seeing’. Although refugees are frequently represented in visual media, they are rarely in control of their own images; their stories and forms are usually captured and communicated by others. In an attempt to offer a first-person narrative account of the experience of living in exile, They Will Have to Kill Us First, synthesizes a visual collage of resistance, personal narratives, and ethnographic insights into individual democratic participation, through the personal stories of a group of displaced musicians.

The post-screening discussion will explore how the documentary offers an alternative way of seeing the experiences of exile as well as address opinions around the relationship between refugees and visual culture with a particular reference to notions of visibility, representation and the relation between visualisations and ‘evidence’. This discussion will also include a reflection on visual culture as a field in which power struggles take place; focusing on what is being made visible and what remains invisible.

Additional information about the film:

THEY WILL HAVE TO KILL US FIRST (2015)

Duration: 99 minutes

http://www.theywillhavetokillusfirst.com/

Trailer: http://www.theywillhavetokillusfirst.com/trailer/

Synopsis: Music is the beating heart of Malian culture. But when Islamic hardliners took control of northern Mali in 2012, they enforced one of the harshest interpretations of sharia law in history and, crucially for Mali, they banned all forms of music. Radio stations were destroyed, instruments burned and Mali’s musicians faced torture, even death. Overnight, Mali’s revered musicians were forced into hiding or exile where most remain even now. But rather than lay down their instruments, the musicians are fighting back, standing up for their cultural heritage and identity. Through everything, they have used music as their weapon against the on-going violence that has left Mali ravaged.

They Will Have To Kill Us First begins with musicians on the run, reveals rare footage of the jihadists, captures life at refugee camps, follows perilous journeys home to battle scarred cities, and witnesses our two female characters perform at the first public concert in Timbuktu since the music ban. The stories of these artists are told without gloss – they are sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes inspirational, and sometimes incredibly frustrating as we watch musicians make tough choices about their futures.

With a specially commissioned soundtrack from Mali’s most exciting artists, a score written by the Yeah Yeah Yeah’s Nick Zinner, They Will Have To Kill Us First leaps headfirst into a tale of courage in the face of conflict.

Awards & Nominations:

BFI London Film Festival (2015)

15)WOMEX Film Selection

SOUND+VISION (2015)

Santa Fe Independent Film Festival (2015)

Oiff Official Selection (2015)

indieBo (2015)

hotDOCS (2015)

Frederick Film Festival (2015)

Durban International Film Festival

CPH:DOX (2015)

CIMM:FEST (2015)

RIDM (2015)


Friday 23 June 2017

Visual Culture of the Classical World at Durham - A Research Conversation Day

9:30am to 5:30pm

Kenworthy Hall, St Mary's College, Durham University.

There is a range of scholars at Durham University who are engaged in research pertaining to visual culture of the ancient Classical world, including visual cultures of ancient groups and reception in later periods. Spread through various departments, their work finds a meeting ground in Durham’s Centre for Visual Arts and Culture, as well as the Durham Centre for Classical Reception.

In 2016, the Centre for Visual Arts and Culture hosted what was the first in a series of research conversation days, entitled Visual Culture/Visual Anthropology. This year a second research conversation day will draw together scholars working on Classical-related visual culture to introduce aspects of their research. Including studies of visual culture within the ancient Greco-Roman world and its fringes, and images of the ‘Classical’ past in later periods, this day will allow scholars and students to share approaches and materials, fostering greater awareness of the range of and relationships between work being conducted at Durham. The day-long event is free of charge and includes lunch and refreshments. Spaces are limited, so early registration is advised.

Please email Catherine M. Draycott, at

catherine.draycott@durham.ac.uk.

Contact catherine.draycott@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.