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Durham University

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

Previous Events

List of months

Tuesday 3 May 2016

'The Good, the Bad, and the Incompetent: Representing the Father in Soviet Visual Culture After Stalin' with Claire McCallum

6:00pm to 8:00pm, Hogan Lovells, Palatine Centre, Durham University, Claire McCallum

Drawing on the range of satirical and humorous cartoons published in popular
magazines of the day, this paper will examine how the Soviet father was
represented in the years following the death of Stalin.


Tuesday 10 May 2016

Bowes Lecture Series: Dr Toby Osborne, ‘Olive Porter and Van Dyck: Religion and Politics at the Stuart Court’

6:00pm to 7:00pm, The Bowes Museum , Dr Toby Osborne

Olive Porter and Van Dyck: Religion and Politics at the Stuart Court

The portrait of the Stuart courtier, Olive Porter, by Anthony van Dyck, which has recently been acquired by the Bowes, rightly takes the centre stage in the forthcoming ‘English Rose’ exhibition. As a portrait painter, Van Dyck pointedly look back to the greatest court portraitist of the sixteenth century, Titian, while setting the standards for court portraits for generations afterwards. What is more, Van Dyck has often been characterised as the painter who captured the spirit of Charles I’s court in its Indian summer before the outbreak of civil war during the 1640s. As this talk explores, his images of English female courtiers, among them, Olive Porter, Alethea Talbot, Lucy Hay, and Mary Hill are especially interesting. These women contributed significantly in their own rights to the style and atmosphere of the Stuart court that encompassed both king and Henrietta Maria, the queen; that style was cosmopolitan, taking its lead from Catholic Europe, and it was Van Dyck, himself experienced as a court painter in Catholic Europe, who brought that dash of European glamour the Stuart court earnestly desired.

Free to Durham University Students. Discount of 50% for friends of The Bowes Museum, Art fund members, NADFAS members, Durham University staff.


Tuesday 17 May 2016

Informal lunch, short introduction and screening of BODY GAMES. CAPOEIRA AND ANCESTRY (JOGO DE CORPO. CAPOEIRA E ANCESTRALIDADE) with director Matthias Röhrig Assunção

12:30pm to 4:00pm, Birley Room, Hatfield College, Matthias Röhrig Assunção

CVAC is delighted to welcome Matthias Röhrig Assunção to Durham. He is one of the directors of the award winning film BODY GAMES. CAPOEIRA AND ANCESTRY (JOGO DE CORPO. CAPOEIRA E ANCESTRALIDADE). During his visit he will be giving a talk, answering questions and screening the film. (First talk and screening 12:30 at Birley Room). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_qzE61iFt4

BODY GAMES presents a sensual tapestry of combat games from both sides of the Atlantic. It tells a story driven by Mestre Cobra Mansás need to understand the ancestry of his art form, Capoeira, as part of a wider concern with his Afro-Brazilian heritage. The search starts in Rio where, as a 12 year old street child, Cobra found survival and self-esteem playing Capoeira. Through Capoeira he grew into Brazil ́s black movement and discovered hisidentity as an Afro-Brazilian. A powerful Brazilian myth links Capoeira to a legendary Angolan game called Engolo. Through an exchange of Capoeira and Engoloin the dusty villages of Southern Angola, Cobra and his friends begins to understand the affinities and differences between combat games played on both sides of the Atlantic.

If you would like to attend this part of the event which includes lunch, please book your place by emailing cvac@durham.ac.uk.


Extended Talk with questions and Screening of BODY GAMES. CAPOEIRA AND ANCESTRY (JOGO DE CORPO. CAPOEIRA E ANCESTRALIDADE) with director Matthias Röhrig Assunção

4:30pm to 7:00pm, Elvet Riverside 142, Matthias Röhrig Assunção

CVAC is delighted to welcome Matthias Röhrig Assunção to Durham. He is one of the directors of the award winning film BODY GAMES. CAPOEIRA AND ANCESTRY (JOGO DE CORPO. CAPOEIRA E ANCESTRALIDADE). During his visit he will be giving a talk, answering questions and screening the film. (Second talk and screening 16:30 at Elvet Riverside 142). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_qzE61iFt4

BODY GAMES presents a sensual tapestry of combat games from both sides of the Atlantic. It tells a story driven by Mestre Cobra Mansás need to understand the ancestry of his art form, Capoeira, as part of a wider concern with his Afro-Brazilian heritage. The search starts in Rio where, as a 12 year old street child, Cobra found survival and self-esteem playing Capoeira. Through Capoeira he grew into Brazil ́s black movement and discovered hisidentity as an Afro-Brazilian. A powerful Brazilian myth links Capoeira to a legendary Angolan game called Engolo. Through an exchange of Capoeira and Engoloin the dusty villages of Southern Angola, Cobra and his friends begins to understand the affinities and differences between combat games played on both sides of the Atlantic.

Contact cvac@durahm.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Thursday 19 May 2016

CVAC and IAS Visual Evidence Series: Authority, Attribution and the Politics of Conniosseurships (c.1700 - 1900) - Workshop

2:00pm to 2:00pm, Senate Suite (19th) and Oriental Musuem (20th)

In recent years, there has been an explosion of scholarly interest in the practices by which the fine-arts have been historically collected, classified and institutionally legitimized. In the process the historiography of art history has been dramatically revised. A host of studies have identified the elusive but pivotal role of commercial networks, dealers and critics in the maintenance and extension of ‘art worlds’. Dealers and critics acted as proxies for plutocrats and for governments at a time when the quest for prestigious artworks was a source of acute geopolitical competition. This workshop will explore the political, economic and juridical questions related to the authentication and ownership of works of art in the heyday of nation-formation, imperialism, globalization and world war.

Please click here to see the programme.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 20 May 2016

CVAC and IAS Visual Evidence Series: Authority, Attribution and the Politics of Conniosseurships (c.1700 - 1900) - Workshop

2:00pm to 2:00pm, Senate Suite (19th) and Oriental Musuem (20th)

In recent years, there has been an explosion of scholarly interest in the practices by which the fine-arts have been historically collected, classified and institutionally legitimized. In the process the historiography of art history has been dramatically revised. A host of studies have identified the elusive but pivotal role of commercial networks, dealers and critics in the maintenance and extension of ‘art worlds’. Dealers and critics acted as proxies for plutocrats and for governments at a time when the quest for prestigious artworks was a source of acute geopolitical competition. This workshop will explore the political, economic and juridical questions related to the authentication and ownership of works of art in the heyday of nation-formation, imperialism, globalization and world war.

Please click here to see the programme.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Tuesday 24 May 2016

CVAC and IAS Visual Evidence Series: Understand Visual Evidence 2 - Workshop

12:00pm to 6:00pm, Calvert Room, St. Mary's College

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Bowes Lecture Series: Professor Andy Beresford, ‘The Legend of St Lucy in Medieval Spanish Art'

6:00pm to 7:00pm, The Bowes Museum , Professor Andy Beresford

This paper explores the representation of St Lucy in medieval Spanish art, focusing predominately on a late thirteenth-century altarpiece produced in north western Catalonia, where the identity of the saint is partially conflated with that of her illustrious Sicilian forebear, St Agatha. In addition to a consideration of the complex relationship between vision and blindness, the paper discusses the signifying potential of the human body and the function of images of suffering as catalysts for devotion. It seeks in so doing to question medieval conceptions of identity, showing how the borders of identity are fluid and unstable rather than rigid or fixed.

Free to Durham University Students. Discount of 50% for friends of The Bowes Museum, Art fund members, NADFAS members, Durham University staff.