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Courses

F3K209 Particles, Strings and Cosmology MSc Postgraduate Taught  2017

Essentials

Degree MSc
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 1 year
Start Date 02-10-2017
Location Durham City
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/mathematical.sciences
Email maths.postgraduate@durham.ac.uk
Telephone +44 (0)191 334 3082

Course Content

Description

This is a one year advanced taught course. The aim of this course is to bring students in 12 months to the frontier of elementary particle theory. This course is intended for students who have already obtained a good first degree in either physics or mathematics, including in the latter case courses in quantum mechanics and relativity.

The course consists of three modules: the first two are the Michaelmas and Epiphany graduate lecture courses, which are assessed by examinations in January and March. The third module is a dissertation on a topic of current research, prepared under the guidance of a supervisor with expertise in the area. We offer a wide variety of possible dissertation topics. The dissertation must be submitted by September 15th, the end of the twelve month course period.

Course Structure

The main group of lectures are given in the first two terms of the academic year (Michaelmas and Epiphany). This part of the lecture course is assessed by examinations. In each term there are two teaching periods of four weeks, with a week's break in the middle of the term in which students will be able to revise the material. Most courses are either eight lectures or 16 lectures in length. There are 14 lectures/week in the Michaelmas term and 14 lectures/week in Epiphany term.

Core Modules

  • Introductory Field Theory
  • Group Theory
  • Standard Model
  • General Relativity
  • Quantum Electrodynamics
  • Quantum Field Theory
  • Conformal Field Theory
  • Supersymmetry
  • Anomalies
  • Strong Interaction Physics
  • Cosmology
  • Superstrings and D-branes
  • Non-Perturbative Physics
  • Euclidean Field Theory
  • Flavour Physics and Effective Field Theory
  • Neutrinos and Astroparticle Physics
  • 2d Quantum Field Theory.

Optional Modules available in previous years included:

  • Differential Geometry for Physicists
  • Boundaries and Defects in Integrable Field Theory
  • Computing for Physicists.

For further information on this course, please visit the Centre for Particle Theory website.

Course Learning and Teaching

This is a full-year degree course, starting early October and finishing in the middle of the subsequent September. The aim of the course is to bring students to the frontier of research in elementary particle theory.

The course consists of three modules: the first two are the Michaelmas and Epiphany graduate lecture courses. The third module is a dissertation on a topic of current research, prepared under the guidance of a supervisor with expertise in the area. We offer a wide variety of possible dissertation topics.

The lectures begin with a general survey of particle physics and introductory courses on quantum field theory and group theory. These lead on to more specialised topics, amongst others in string theory, cosmology, supersymmetry and more detailed aspects of the standard model.

The main group of lectures is given in the first two terms of the academic year (Michaelmas and Epiphany). This part of the lecture course is assessed by examinations. In each term there are two teaching periods of 4 weeks, with a week's break in the middle of the term in which students will be able to revise the material. Most courses are either 8 lectures or 16 lectures in length. There are 14 lectures/week in the Michaelmas term and 14 lectures/week in Epiphany term they are supported by weekly tutorials. In addition lecturers also set a number of homework assignments which give the student a chance to test his or her understanding of the material.

There are additional optional lectures in the third term. These introduce advanced topics and are intended as preparation for research in these areas.

The dissertation must be submitted by mid-September, the end of the twelve month course period.

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A good second class honours degree (2.1 Honours) or international equivalent in either Physics or Mathematics.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/apply

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £6,900.00
Home Student £6,900.00
Island Student £6,900.00
International non-EU Student £16,500.00

Note: Fees are subject to review and change in-line with inflation.

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/finance

Career Opportunities

Department of Mathematical Sciences

For further information on career options and employability, including the results of the Destination of Leavers survey, student and employer testimonials and details of work experience and study abroad opportunities, please visit our employability web pages

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

Postgraduate Visits

PGVI or

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit/

Department Information

Department of Mathematical Sciences

Overview
The Department of Mathematical Sciences is one of the leading research units in the country, with interests in a wide range of areas in pure mathematics, applied mathematics and theoretical physics, as well as statistics and probability. The Department has excellent facilities for postgraduate studies. All research students have their own workspace with a network linked computer. We also offer many research seminar series in which students actively participate. One measure of the vibrancy of our research is the number of postgraduate students we attract.
Each year, several high-level conferences and workshops in Mathematical Sciences are held in Durham, including the London Mathematical Society (LMS) – EPSRC Durham Symposia (a prestigious series of high-quality international research conferences), and students are also given the opportunity to present their research results at conferences elsewhere. The Department is part of MAGIC, a consortium of 16 universities offering distance learning for postgraduate students via interactive access-grid technology. The Department is a member of the Academy for PhD Training in Statistics (APTS), giving postgraduate students access to high-quality training courses covering key areas of statistics and probability.

Ranking

Ranked joint 1st in the UK for Internationally Excellent and World-Leading research impact in REF 2014.
Website
www.durham.ac.uk/mathematical.sciences

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