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Durham University

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Become a citizen-scientist and help us track songbirds this spring

(30 March 2021)

Image of a blue tit

From the melodic tune of the blackbird to the cheerful chirp of the house sparrow, birdsong is all around us now spring is in the air.

So, why not become a citizen-scientist and help us track the variety and distribution of garden birds by tuning into the songs they are singing?

Tune into birdsong

Researchers from our Department of Biosciences are encouraging people to get involved in their latest project, Nature’s Audio, by listening-to and recording garden birdsong in their garden or local area and uploading this to a dedicated website.

The project is aiming to produce the first nationwide sample of birdsong across the UK, to help understand where and when birds are singing this spring.

To take part all you need is a smartphone to record the birdsong you hear and upload it to the project website for inclusion in the study.

The website also has sound clips and information to help visitors learn how to identify different birds through their songs.

Budding ornithologists can even help to identify species in the audio clips collected by the project and you can look up the birds that have been identified in your own recordings.

Boost your well-being

The project is open to anyone and if you don’t have access to a garden, you can listen out for birdsong in your local park or when out and about.

Our researchers hope that by taking part people will also connect with nature in their local area and boost their personal well-being.

Find out more

Visit the Nature’s Audio website

Watch a video about the project

Read about our Department of Biosciences

Find out more about Durham’s world-leading research here