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Durham University

Computing and Information Services

Creative Commons

A very common way of providing permissions to use online materials is now through creative commons licencing. Copyright holders use symbols to and acronyms to identify to third parties what permissions they grant in regards to future use of their copyright materials. Look out for these symbols often displayed next to online images/video or via a nearby link. The licences that a copyright holder can choose from are detailed below.

If you have any questions on using Creative Commons Licences please contact the University’s Legal Support team at legal.support@durham.ac.uk

cc-by

Attribution (CC BY)

This license allows anyone to distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon the work, even commercially, as long as they credit the copyright holder for the original creation. This is the most accommodating of creative commons licenses. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.

cc-by-sa

Attribution-ShareAlike (CC BY-SA)

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon the work even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit the copyright holder and license their new creations under the identical terms. This license is often compared to “copyleft” free and open source software licenses. All new works based on the original will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also allow commercial use. This is the license used by Wikipedia, and is recommended for materials that would benefit from incorporating content from Wikipedia and similarly licensed projects.

cc-by-nd

Attribution-NoDerivs (CC BY-ND)

This license allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to the copyright holder.

cc-by-nc

Attribution-NonCommercial (CC BY-NC)

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon a work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge copyright holder and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same terms.

cc-by-nc-sa

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA)

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon a work non-commercially, as long as they credit the copyright holder and license their new creations under the identical terms.

cc-by-nc-nd

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)

This license is the most restrictive of the six main licenses, only allowing others to download works and share them with others as long as they credit the copyright holder, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.

So, provided you correctly identify the applicable creative commons Licence, and operate only within the boundaries of this licence, you can use the works as described.

Further Information

If you have any further questions on Copyright or Creative Commons Licences please contact the University’s Legal Support team at legal.support@durham.ac.uk

For questions or concerns surround the use of material held in the library and licenced recordings contact Mr Colin Theakston the Copyright Officer for Durham University colin.theakston@durham.ac.uk

To view Durham University Library’s Copyright Licensing

A broad range of information is available from JISC Legal Information’s Copyright Law Overview (12 June 2014)

Further information about intellectual property rights (copyright and patents) can be found at Intellectual Property Office’s website.

Further information about Creative Commons can be found on their website.