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Durham Castle Lecture Series

2012/13 Lecture Videos

Films of the 2012/13 Castle Lecture Series are available to view. Simply click on the links below to watch each film.

 

Wednesday 31st October 2012

Professor Lord Tony Giddens,Former Director of the London School of Economics, Emeritus Professor of Sociology, London School of Economics

"The Politics of Climate Change"

According to some prominent researchers, the Arctic may be ice-free in the summer within five years - with massive implications for the world's weather patterns. Most of the melting of the ice is almost certainly the result of humanly-induced global warming. Instead of seeking to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, however, the nations close to the Arctic are looking to drill for oil there and are squabbling over territorial rights. It is a specific example of a wider issue: why is the world seemingly so indifferent to climate change as a threat to the continuity of our civilisation?

The Politics of Climate Change

The Politics of Climate Change

Views: 1438

Watch Professor Lord Anthony Giddens discuss the politics of climate change as part of Durham Castle Lecture Series on 31st October 2012.

Wednesday 14th November 2012

The Rt Revd Justin Welby, Bishop of Durham, Formerly Dean of Liverpool Cathedral

“Seen but not Heard – Should Believers have a Voice in the Polis?"

The Bishop of Durham will explore the increasing tendency, addressed powerfully by Rowan Williams in recent years, to suggest that faith based world views are not only intrinsically wrong, but even if this is not the case, disqualify those holding them either from expressing any opinion in political life (in its broadest terms) or at the very least require them, to excise such a world view from their minds when acting in public life. To put it crudely, hold to any religion you like but don't let it affect your deeds.

Seen But Not Heard -- Should Believers have a Voice in the Polis?

Seen But Not Heard -- Should Believers have a Voice in the Polis?

Views: 529

Watch The Rt. Revd. Justin Welby, Archibshop of Canterbury Designate & Bishop of Durham discuss the increasing tendency to suggest that faith based world views are not intrinsically wrong as part of Durham Castle Lecture Series on 14th November 2012.

Wednesday 28th November 2012

His Excellency David Re,Trial Chamber Judge of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon

“To The Hague: from Nuremberg to the ICC: International Criminal Law Today”

Today, frequent calls are made to send someone or something “to The Hague”. But between Nuremberg and Tokyo, in the late 1940s, to 1993 when the Security Council created the Yugoslav Tribunal (ICTY), there were no international trials of the international crimes of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Today, a permanent international criminal court, two United Nations ad hoc tribunals (ex-Yugoslavia and Rwanda), and two hybrid or internationalized courts (for Sierra Leone and in Cambodia) investigate and try these crimes. Another hybrid tribunal (for Lebanon) uses international criminal procedures. Judge David Reexplores the progression from what, after the Second World War was sometimes termed “victor’s justice”, to today’s sophisticated system of international criminal law and asks, “how and why have we come so far in the last 19 years?”

To The Hague: from Nuremberg to the ICC: International Criminal Law Today

To The Hague: from Nuremberg to the ICC: International Criminal Law Today

Views: 2389

Watch His Excellency David Re, Trial Chamber Judge of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon discuss international criminal law today as part of Durham Castle Lecture Series on 28th November 2012.

Wednesday 23rd January 2013

Professor Conor Gearty, Professor of Human Rights Law, London School of Economics

“Liberty and Security – For All?”

We all aspire to liberty and security in our lives but few of us truly enjoy them. In this lecture Conor Gearty describes how this has come to be the case. Drawing on the insights set out in his latest book, Liberty and Security (Polity 2013) he describes our world as 'neodemocratic', a place where the proclamation of universal liberty and security is mocked by facts on the ground: the vast inequalities in supposedly free societies, the authoritarian regimes with regular elections, and the terrible socio-economic deprivation that is camouflaged by cynically proclaimed commitments to human rights. Gearty's lecture offers an explanation of how this situation has come about how we can all think we enjoy freedom while so few of us do. The lecture also provides a criticism of the present age which tolerates it. At the end of the lecture Gearty sets out a manifesto for a better future, a place where liberty and security can exist in truth and not just in camouflage for servitude.

Liberty and Security - For All

Liberty and Security - For All

Views: 363

Watch Professor Conor Gearty, Professor of Human Rights Law at London School of Economics discuss liberty and security as part of Durham Castle Lecture Series on 23rd January 2013.

Wednesday 27th February 2013

Mr. Martin Wolf, Associate Editor and Chief Economics Commentator at the Financial Times

“How the Financial Crisis has Changed the World”

Since the summer of 2007, a wave of financial crises has engulfed the West, overthrowing conventional wisdom on policy, devastating economies and throwing the future of Europe into question. The lecture will address the legacy of these unexpected events. Among these results, it will argue, are: prolonged weakness in private consumption in high-income countries; a challenge to pre-crisis conventional wisdom on economics and economic policy; a battle over re-regulation of the financial sector; a need to deal with the longer-term consequences of the unprecedented policy interventions by central banks and governments; a weakening in the fiscal positions of many countries; a threat to the survival of the Euro zone and so to the post-second-world-war project for unifying Europe; a need to re-balance global patterns of demand and supply; and, last but not least, an enduring transformation in the balance of global prestige and power.

How the Crisis Changed the World

How the Crisis Changed the World

Views: 1884

Watch Martin Wolf, Associate Editor and Chief Economics Commentator at the Financial Times discuss how the crisis changed the world as part of Durham Castle Lecture Series on 27th February 2013.

Wednesday 6th March 2013

Professor Danny Quah, Kuwait Professor of Economics and International Development, London School of Economics

“Managing the World: We have to Talk about Power”

The economic gravity of the world is shifting radically. In the 19th and early 20th century the centre of gravity was mid-Atlantic. Now, it is shifting rapidly to the East. The world is becoming more multipolar and with this new interests are emerging- challenging the dominance of Western power. As the old power structures weaken and break up, there is a great danger that there is no longer a force or a legitimate authority capable of upholding the rules of international order. In this lecture Danny Quah will elaborate these themes and explore the implications for leading states. He will also raise a difficult question of whether the world order requires a hegemonic power.

Managing the World: We have to Talk about Power

Managing the World: We have to Talk about Power

Views: 657

Professor Danny Quah, Kuwait Professor of Economics and International Development at London School of Economics delivered a lecture entitled Managing the World: We have to Talk about Power as part of Durham University's Castle Lecture Series on 6th March 2013

Wednesday 13th March 2013

Professor Michael Cox, Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics

“Power Shifts, Economic Change and the Decline of the West?”

It has become the new truth of the early 21st century that the Western world we have known is fast losing its pre-eminence to be replaced by a new international system shaped either by the so-called BRICs, the ‘rest’ or, more popularly by that very broadly defined geographical entity known as Asia. This at least is how many economists, historians and students of world politics are now viewing the future of the larger international system. This essay does not dispute some self-evident economic facts. Nor does it assume that the world will look the same in fifty years time as it does now. It does however question the idea that there is an irresistible “power shift” in the making and that the West and the United States are in steep decline. Specifically it makes a number of critical arguments concerning the new narrative.

Power Shifts, Economic Change and the Decline of the West?

Power Shifts, Economic Change and the Decline of the West?

Views: 1561

Professor Michael Cox, Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics delivered a lecture entitled "Power Shifts, Economic Change and the Decline of the West?" as part of Durham University's Castle Lecture Series on 13th March 2013

Wednesday 24th April 2013

Professor David Held, Master of University College, Durham University, Professor of International Relations, Durham University

“Gridlock: Why Global Cooperation is Failing”

This lecture focuses on why international negotiations on pressing global issues are increasingly stalling in the face of growing differences among national interests, strident voices of leading and new emerging powers, and the sheer complexity involved in coming to agreement on issues that transcend national boundaries. From world trade negotiations to financial market reform and climate change, ‘gridlock’ increasingly characterises international negotiations and organisations. This lecture grapples with the causes and consequences of gridlock across leading areas of global concern: security, the economy, and the environment. As things stand, the global order is drifting into a highly uncertain territory which may well involve cataclysmic moments affecting the life chances and life expectancy of people across the world.

Gridlock: Why Global Cooperation is Failing When We Need it Most

Gridlock: Why Global Cooperation is Failing When We Need it Most

Views: 854

Watch Professor David Held deliver a lecture entitled 'Gridlock: Why Global Cooperation is Failing When We Need it Most' as part of the Castle Lecture Series on 24th April 2013.

Wednesday 15th May 2013

Professor John B. Thompson, Professor of Sociology and Fellow of Jesus College, University of Cambridge

"The Future of the Book"

Today, the publishing business is in turmoil. For 500 years, the methods and practices of book publishing remained largely unchanged, but today the industry finds itself faced with the greatest challenges since Gutenberg.

These challenges are the outcome of two processes. On the one hand, the publishing business has been transformed beyond recognition by a set of profound social and economic changes that have been underway since the 1960s, resulting in the publishing landscape we see around us today: a handful of large corporate publishers based in New York and London and owned by large multimedia conglomerates; an array of powerful agents who have become the unavoidable gateway into publishing for writers and would-be writers; and a retail landscape dominated by a dwindling number of retail chains, mass merchandisers and Amazon. On the other hand, the technological upheaval associated with the digital revolution is now having a major impact on the book publishing business. After a decade of numerous false dawns, e-books have now arrived and they are here to stay. This lecture explores these complex trends and discusses the future of the book and what and how we read.

The Future of the Book with Professor John B. Thompson

The Future of the Book with Professor John B. Thompson

Views: 241

Watch a lecture entitled 'The Future of the Book' with Professor John B. Thompson as part of the Durham Castle Lecture Series which was held on 15th May 2013.

Wednesday 29th May 2013

Human Suffering and Humanitarian Response with Prof Craig Calhoun

Human Suffering and Humanitarian Response with Prof Craig Calhoun

Views: 335

Watch a lecture entitled Human Suffering and Humanitarian Response with Prof Craig Calhoun as part of the Castle Lecture Series.

Professor Craig Calhoun, Director of the London School of Economics

"Human Suffering and Humanitarian Response"

Humanitarian emergencies are not simply brute facts, appealing directly to our emotions or our moral sensibilities. They are one of the important ways in which perceptions of human life, sympathy for suffering, and responses to social upheaval have come to be organized in recent decades. Like nations and business corporations, they are creatures of social imaginaries, but no less materially influential for that. They are shaped by a history of changing ideas about the human; moral responsibility for strangers; structures of chance and causality; and the imperative and capacity for effective action, even at a distance. They reflect the context of the modern era generally and more specific features of the era since the 1970s. And they are embedded in a complex institutionalisation of responses. This lecture will explore these difficult issues.

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