Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.

Events

Economics and Finance seminar series

Wednesday, 12 December 2018
15:30 to 17:00
Alberto Vesperoni
Durham University Business School, MHL 453

Alberto Vesperoni, from the University of Klagenfurt, is speaking at this seminar. Click here for more information.

Ethnic geography: measurement and evidence", joint work with Roland Hodler and Michele Valsecchi: Paper can be viewed here

Abstract

The effects of ethnic geography, i.e., the distribution of ethnic groups across space, on economic, political and social outcomes are not well understood. We develop a novel index of ethnic segregation that takes both ethnic and spatial distances between individuals into account. Importantly, we can decompose this index into indices of spatial dispersion, generalized ethnic fractionalization, and the alignment of spatial and ethnic distances. We use maps of ethnic homelands, historical population density data, and language trees to compute these four indices for 159 countries. We apply these indices to study the relation between ethnic geography and current economic, political and social outcomes. We document that countries with higher ethno-spatial alignment, i.e., countries where ethnically diverse individuals lived far apart, have a higher-quality government, higher incomes and higher levels of trust.

Economics and Finance seminar series

Wednesday, 12 December 2018
15:30 to 17:00
Alberto Vesperoni
Durham University Business School, MHL 453

Alberto Vesperoni, from the University of Klagenfurt, is speaking at this seminar. Click here for more information.

Ethnic geography: measurement and evidence", joint work with Roland Hodler and Michele Valsecchi: Paper can be viewed here

Abstract

The effects of ethnic geography, i.e., the distribution of ethnic groups across space, on economic, political and social outcomes are not well understood. We develop a novel index of ethnic segregation that takes both ethnic and spatial distances between individuals into account. Importantly, we can decompose this index into indices of spatial dispersion, generalized ethnic fractionalization, and the alignment of spatial and ethnic distances. We use maps of ethnic homelands, historical population density data, and language trees to compute these four indices for 159 countries. We apply these indices to study the relation between ethnic geography and current economic, political and social outcomes. We document that countries with higher ethno-spatial alignment, i.e., countries where ethnically diverse individuals lived far apart, have a higher-quality government, higher incomes and higher levels of trust.