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Department of Anthropology: Asian (In)Fertilities

News

Selected news stories from the international press relating to Asian (In)Fertilities:

Avoid late marriage, tight pants to escape infertility - Times of India

(14 July 2009)

Women better avoid late marriage and men tight pants, for they may lead to fewer babies, according to a Malaysian study.

Dr V. Jeyabalan a Pantai Hospital fertility specialist, says that blames smoking, casual sex, and junk food are the other factors that are to blame for causing infertility. “The changing role of women is the main reason for their infertility,” the New Straits-Times quoted him as saying. “They are getting married late now as they have to build a career alongside men to become equal breadwinners,” he added. He said so while reacting to a recent United Nations Children’s Fund report that Malaysians were having fewer babies these days, compared with the situation in 1990. According to him, the intake of junk food—which mostly contained additives and meats injected with hormones—has increased among career-oriented women He says that such women also have multiple sex partners, and that they sometimes even indulge in casual sex, which results in sexually transmitted diseases. "Venereal diseases such as gonorrhoea and syphilis combined with previous abortions and smoking, which has gradually become increasingly common among women, can prevent conception and sometimes cause miscarriages," he said. He said of the 30 couples he saw on the average daily, most of the men and women were aged between 30 and 40 seeking to have their first child. Jeyabalan pointed out that wearing tight pants and the presence of petrol fumes and chemicals around their workplaces generally reduce fertility among men. He called on the Government to get insurance companies to pay the bills of those seeking fertility treatment. "In Western countries, because fertility treatments are expensive, the cost is either subsidised by the government or it can be claimed against a patient’s medical policy. But in Malaysia, those who suffer from childlessness can do neither," he said.

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